Your Guide to Connecticut Business Entities by Attorney Scott Franklin

ABOUT LLCexpress.com
LLCexpress is a start-up package specifically designed for the launch of a single owner business in Connecticut.
This web-based service is offered by the Law Offices of Scott Franklin. See www.LLCexpress.com for information.
Here’s what you’ll get with our low-cost LLCexpress service:
• Attorney Scott Franklin is available to personally answer your questions by phone or e-mail
• Preparation of Customized LLC Documents in Full Compliance with Connecticut Law (including your customized LLC
Operating Agreement)
• We handle the filings with the CT Secretary of State
• Start-Up Checklist to Help You Properly Launch Your Business
• We can also obtain your Tax Identification Numbers (both your Federal EIN and your CT State Tax Registration Number)
LLCexpress is a division of Scott Franklin, Attorney at Law.

INTRODUCTION
Whether you’re just starting your business or have been in operation for years, you’ll want to be sure that your
business entity is the right one for you. While it may seem the simplest approach to just open your doors for
business without forming a legal business entity, this may not be the best approach for you. Because if you don’t
operate your business as a corporation or limited liability company (LLC), you’ll be exposing your personal assets
to the risks of your business.

Under Connecticut law, if you operate your business as a sole proprietorship or as a general partnership, your
business entity provides no legal protection for your personal assets. But, if you operate your business as a
corporation or an LLC, in general, your personal assets are protected from the liabilities of your business.
Every business has its own legal risks. If you’re unclear about the risks arising out of your particular business, it’s best to consult with an attorney. In general, the best way to protect yourself and your business from legal risks is to: (a) form and properly maintain a limited liability entity; and (b) maintain appropriate insurance.
Let’s examine your options to structure your business keeping in mind that choosing the right entity can provide
you protection from personal liability.
• Sole Proprietorship • Corporation
• General Partnership • Limited Liability Company

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIP
• Only One Owner
• No Protection From Personal Liability
• No Continuity of Business on Death of Owner
• Not Subject to Entity Income Tax

If you are in business on your own and you have not formed any other business entity, then you are operating as a sole proprietor. As a sole proprietor, there is no legal distinction between you and your business. Th is means that your personal assets are at risk if your business is sued.

As a sole proprietor you can operate under your own name or under a tradename. If you are operating under a tradename, this is referred to as a d/b/a which stands for ‘doing business as’. As an example, let’s assume that John Smith runs a lawn care business under the name ‘Lovely Lawns.’ John Smith is the owner of the business. He is a sole proprietor doing business as ‘Lovely Lawns.’ The legal name of his business is therefore ‘John Smith d/b/a Lovely Lawns’.

There are no legal documents required to form a sole proprietorship. However, you are required to file a tradename (or fictitious name) certificate if you are operating your business under a tradename which does not include your surname. This certificate is filed with the town clerk where you maintain your principal place of business. Note that the filing of this tradename certificate does not provide you any exclusive or proprietary rights to the use of that tradename.
• Only One Owner
• No Protection From Personal Liability
• No Continuity of Business on Death of Owner
• Not Subject to Entity Income Tax

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIP
A sole proprietorship does not survive the death of the owner. Instead, the assets of the business become part of the sole proprietor’s estate and are distributed to the beneficiaries under his or her will. If there is no will, the assets are distributed in accordance with applicable state law.

Remember that you will be required to obtain a Connecticut state tax identification number and other tax identification numbers for your sole proprietorship. You’ll want to check with your accountant to find out what taxes your business may be required to pay. As a sole proprietor you will be reporting the income and expenses for your business on Schedule C of your personal tax return.

GENERAL PARTNERSHIP
• Two or More Owners
• No Protection From Personal Liability
• Partnership Agreement Recommended
• Not Subject to Entity Income Tax

GENERAL PARTNERSHIP
A general partnership is a business entity in which two or more people join together to share in the profits of an enterprise. If you are operating as a general partnership then your entity provides you no protection from personal liability. Further, as a general partner, you are personally, jointly and severally, liable for all obligations of the business.

Let’s look at an example. Let’s assume your partnership consists of five partners. One of your partners arranges for the delivery of $10,000 worth of business inventory on credit. In general, any act taken by a partner in the ordinary course of business is binding on the partnership. This means that you can be held personally liable for this business obligation. You can be held personally liable for the entire $10,000 obligation because each partner can be held liable by a creditor of the partnership for the entire obligation, not just his pro-rata share of it. obligation, not just his pro-rata share of it.

While there are no legal documents required to form a general partnership, it is important that the partners adopt a written partnership agreement. In addition to financial and management issues, the partnership agreement should address ‘buy-sell’ issues. These include a mechanism to buy out a partner’s interest in the business on death, retirement, termination or disability. The death of a partner can create difficulties for the business and the
remaining partners unless adequately provided for in the partnership agreement. (See A Business with Multiple Owners, page 6. )

Just as with a sole proprietorship, if the partnership is operating under a tradename, it must file a tradename
certificate with the town clerk in the town where it maintains its principal place of business. Remember that you will be required to obtain a Connecticut state tax identification number and other tax identification numbers for your general partnership. You’ll want to check with your accountant to find out what taxes your business may
be required to pay.

As a general partnership, your partnership is required to file an informational tax return with the IRS (IRS Form 1065) and with the CT Department of Revenue Services (Form CT-1065). The partnership as an entity is not required to pay income tax. The taxable income (or loss) of the partnership is ‘passed through’ to the partners who then report such taxable income or loss on their personal tax returns. This is why a partnership is referred to as a ‘pass through’ tax entity.

CORPORATION
• One or More Owners
• Provides Protection From Personal Liability
• Minute Book Must Be Maintained
• Continued Existence on Death of Shareholder
• May be Subject to Entity Income Tax

CORPORATION
A corporation is a legal entity which is formed under the laws of a particular state. If your principal business location is in Connecticut and you plan to form a corporation, most likely you will choose to form a Connecticut corporation.

A corporation provides protection from personal liability to the owners of the business. In general, it is the assets of the corporation, and not the owners’ personal assets, that are exposed to satisfy the obligations of the business.

To form a Connecticut corporation, certain documents must be filed with the Office of the Secretary of State including the corporation’s Articles of Incorporation and its Organizational Report. A filing fee and franchise tax are payable to the Secretary of State to form a corporation. Also, the corporation is required to file an annual report with the Secretary of State and pay an annual filing fee. In addition to filing documents with the Secretary of State, the organizers of the corporation will adopt the corporation’s Bylaws and other organizational documents which become part of the corporate Minute Book.

A corporation is comprised of its Shareholders, Directors and Officers. It is possible for one person to fulfill
all three roles but it is still important to understand the different legal roles that each one plays in the
corporation. The Shareholders Shareholders are the owners of the are the owners of the corporation. They receive shares of corporate stock in exchange for their initial contributions to the corporation. The shareholders are entitled to receive such dividends as the Board of Directors authorizes. In addition, the shareholders are required to meet at least once a year to elect the Directors of the corporation.

The Directors Directors of the corporation (also referred to as of the corporation (also referred to as the Board of Directors Board of Directors) make the policy decisions for ) make the policy decisions for the corporation. This is done at Board of Directors’ Meetings and the actions taken at those meetings are reflected in corporate Minutes or Resolutions. The corporation needs to maintain records of its organizational documents and Minutes of its Meetings of Shareholders and Directors in its Minute Book. (See Piercing the Veil – Personal Liability, page 6.)

In addition, the Board of Directors appoints the Officers of the corporation. It is the of the corporation. It is the Officers of the of the corporation who implement the policy decisions of the Board and who are responsible for the day-to-day operations of the business.
• One or More Owners
• Provides Protection From Personal Liability
• Minute Book Must Be Maintained
• Continued Existence on Death of Shareholder
• May be Subject to Entity Income Tax

Since a corporation is a separate legal entity, the legal existence of the corporation continues even after a
shareholder dies. A corporation is also a separate taxable entity. This means that a corporation must pay federal
and state corporate income tax on its taxable income each year.

A corporation with up to 100 shareholders that meets certain other IRS criteria, can elect to be treated as a
pass-through tax entity by filing a form with the IRS (IRS Form 2553). Th is corporation is then referred to as
an ‘S’ corporation. A corporation that is not an ‘S’ corporation. A corporation that is not an ‘S’ corporation is referred to as a ‘C’ corporation. Because of the complexity of the tax treatment of corporations, it is particularly important to obtain the advice of a business accountant to help you decide whether the corporation is the right entity for you. Remember that you will be required to obtain a Connecticut state tax identification number and other tax identification numbers for your corporation. You’ll want to check with your accountant to find out what taxes your business may be required to pay.

LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY
• One or More Owners
• Provides Protection From Personal Liability
• Minute Book Must Be Maintained
• Continued Existence on Death of Member
• Not Subject to Entity Income Tax

LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY
The LLC is a business entity that combines the liability protection of the corporation with the pass-through tax treatment of a partnership. This makes it an excellent choice for many small businesses. Adopted in Connecticut in 1993, the LLC is now available in all 50 states.

An LLC is formed under the laws of a particular state. If your principal business location is in Connecticut and you plan to form an LLC, most likely you will choose to form a Connecticut LLC. Articles of Organization are filed with the Office of the Secretary of State to form a Connecticut LLC. A filing fee is payable to form an LLC and the LLC is required to file an annual report with the Secretary of State. In addition to filing the Articles of
Organization, the organizers of the LLC will adopt an LLC Operating Agreement Operating Agreement which is similar to a which is similar to a partnership agreement. The Operating Agreement and other organizational documents become part of the LLC Minute Book.

LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

SINGLE MEMBER LLC If you are in business for yourself, a single-member LLC may be right for you. When first adopted
in Connecticut, the statutes required a minimum of two members to properly form an LLC. But changes in the law now permit the creation of single-member LLC’s. If you’re considering this, remember that it’s important to fully document the organization of your LLC even if you are the sole member. This means adopting an Operating
Agreement and other organizational documents for your LLC. If you simply file the Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State without completing the organization of your LLC, you may be putting your personal assets at risk. Remember that under the doctrine of ‘Piercing the Veil’, failure to maintain complete and up-to-date legal records for your LLC can expose you to personal liability. (See Piercing the Veil – Personal Liability, page 6.)
See www.LLCexpress.com for a web-based start-up package designed specifically for the single owner business located in Connecticut.

The owners of an LLC are called its Members. The LLC can be operated by its members or by a Manager Manager who is appointed by the members. The who is appointed by the members. The Operating Agreement contains detailed provisions
governing the operation of the LLC including the rights and responsibilities of the members. (See A Business with Multiple Owners, page 6. )

Since a limited liability company is a separate legal entity, the legal existence of the LLC continues even after a member dies. Remember that you will be required to obtain a Connecticut state tax identification number and other
tax identification numbers for your LLC. You’ll want to check with your accountant to find out what taxes your business may be required to pay.

An LLC is a ‘pass-through’ tax entity. It is normally treated for income tax purposes just like a partnership. In the case of a single member LLC, the entity is treated for tax purposes like a sole proprietorship with income and expenses reported on a Schedule C Schedule C of your personal tax return. (However, an of your personal tax return. (However, an LLC can elect to be treated as a corporation for tax purposes.)

PIERCING THE VEIL – Personal Liability
Filing the organizational documents with the Secretary of State is not enough to provide you protection from
personal liability. You’ll need to comply with all the legal requirements including maintaining thorough records
for your entity. Failure to do this can expose the owners of a corporation or LLC to personal liability under
the doctrine of ‘piercing the veil’ ‘piercing the veil’. In deciding whether to . In deciding whether to
impose personal liability, Courts look closely at the way the business has been operated. Here are some practical
pointers which not only make good business sense, they will also help to protect you from personal liability
under the doctrine of ‘ under the doctrine of ‘piercing the veil’. piercing the veil’.
• Maintain a complete minute book for your entity including Bylaws for a corporation and an Operating
Agreement for an LLC. It is particularly important for a single member LLC to have an Operating
Agreement. (See Single Member LLC, page 5)
• Use a separate bank account for your corporation or LLC and do not co-mingle your personal and business assets
• Keep thorough financial records
• Make sure the business is adequately capitalized
• Maintain appropriate liability insurance for your business
• Sign all contracts and legal documents on behalf of the entity and not in your individual capacity
• Always hold yourself out to the public as a corporation or LLC on your letterhead, invoices, checks, advertising, etc.

A BUSINESS WITH MULTIPLE OWNERS
If you’re planning to go into business with other people as co-owners in the business, you’ll need to
address management issues. For instance, what happens if one of the owners wants to lease himself a company car. Can he do this without the approval of all the owners? It’s also important to address what the owners? It’s also important to address what are referred to as ‘buy-sell’ issues. What happens if one of the owners wants to sell out his/her interest in the company to a person you dislike or distrust? Can you be forced to share your company with that person? What happens if one of the owners dies? Will his/her spouse step into that owner’s shoes and tell you how to run your company? What if one of the owners becomes inactive through disability or ‘change of lifestyle?’ Will that owner continue to receive the same share of the profits?

None of us has a crystal ball. We don’t know which, if any, of these scenarios will arise in your business.
However, by proper up-front planning, you can put in place established rules for dealing with situations
like these. You can address these issues as part of the organization of your business in a fair and evenhanded
manner. After all, none of the owners knows if he’ll end up on the ‘buy’ side or the ‘sell’ side of these scenarios. By documenting your agreement on these issues, you can deal with them in a way that allows your business to grow and prosper despite these challenges.

YOUR GUIDE TO CONNECTICUT BUSINESS ENTITIES

SOLE PROPRIET-

ORSHIP

GEN. PARTNER-

SHIP

‘S’ CORP

‘C’ CORP

LLC

Personal Liability

YES

YES

NO

NO

NO

Entity Taxation Profits

NO

NO

NO

YES

NO

CT Business Entity Tax

NO

NO

YES

NO, (minimum tax due)

YES

One Owner Permitted

YES

NO

YES

YES

YES

Filings Required With Secretary Of State

NO

NO

YES

YES

YES

Initial Filing Fees To Secretary Of State

$0

$0

$400

$400

$120

Annual Filing Fees To Secretary Of State

$0

$0

$150

$150

$20

Tradename Certificate Required

No, if using surname

No, if using surname

No, if using corporate name

No, if using corporate name

No, if using LLC name

Continuity Of Life

NO

LIMITED

YES

YES

YES

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